Not easy being green? Pfft, let’s try blue.

It’s officially April. Hold your foolish jokes, plzkthnx. I love a good joke, but April Fool’s Day is..it’s ridiculous.

However, April 1st kicks off a great month for me. Let me begin to tell you why.

1. THE COLOR RUN IS HAPPENING IN LESS THAN 30 DAYS. And no, I’m really not prepared for it. But it’s okay. I’ll roll. I’ll totally roll the whole 5k. Don’t put it past me.

2. KRISTY IS COMING TO VISIT AND HOMG I HAVEN’T SEEN HER IN LIKE 5 YEARS AND I’M EXCITED LIKE A LITTLE KID IN A CANDY STORE. Yup. Don’t hate.

3. After so many, MANY times of forgetting to pick one up, and having it in the back of my mind, I made sure we got our blue light. Today. We got our blue light. I’m seriously slacking on this, and I very well may be the worst Aunt Rachel ever because of this, but WE HAVE IT AND WE’LL FINALLY BE LIGHTING IT UP BLUE WITH EVERYONE ELSE. No, I’m not one for following the crowd, but this is the something little I can do. And I think a lot more people should be doing it.

See the title to this post? Am I showing my age by talking about old school Kermit the Frog being all emo about being green and how hard it is? Whatevs. But this is what’s up.

He may have had it hard being green, but kids all over the world are having it even harder with the blue. And red. And yellow. And whatever colors of the spectrum they are. They have to beat down the walls of stereotypes made against them each and every day, at an age when all they should be worrying about is what super hero they want to be that day, or what book they want to read, or WHAT?! THEY HELD A PENCIL CORRECTLY?! THAT’S HUGE!

Why can’t it be that simple? How hard is it to accept that a kid is awesome? It’s just..I don’t even know how to talk about it, honestly.

It’s a pretty hard concept to get if you’re an outsider, and I’ll admit that and wait for my stones from the friends or parents of others with their war cries of “IT’S NOT HARD! JUST ACCEPT IT!” But, here’s the thing. I accept it. I don’t understand it all of the time, but dammit I’ll cheer just like everyone else for these kids. No, I don’t understand what it’s like to be the parent or the kid, but what I do understand is these kids don’t let a diagnosis hold them back. They don’t even fight it, to a certain extent. They live it up. They play with the things we can’t see, they live in a world we can’t feel, and their lives are completely amazing. Adults say all the time that they wish they could be a kid again, and these kids get to live in this magical expanse forever…while those same adults cast their judging stares. Ridiculous? Yes. The norm? Yes. 

I know, I’m going off on a tangent about this. I know, a lot of this is ramblings that are here, there, and everywhere. I’m terrible about it. But real quick, I want to jump to another story. Real quick. Promise.

Selena had her first school music program a few weeks ago. And it was hilarious. All these kids up on the risers trying to follow one director and..it was just a recipe for hilarity.
Selena stood by a little boy in her class named Carter. Carter has Downs Syndrome. Now, you can look at him and see that he’s not quite the “norm”, but Selena didn’t. And she hasn’t. Not since the first day of school.
Selena used to come home every day and talk about her new friend Carter. She would tell me about how they played at recess and she helped him at school. I had no idea who this kid was, but I was glad she was making friends. And then when Selena pointed him out to me in their class pictures, my heart burst.
Carter was having an absolute BLAST at the music program, singing along with everyone else. Selena sat next to him or stood next to him the entire time, and you can bet that when she wasn’t waving to us or singing, she was talking with him. Never once this the phrase “he’s different’ come from her. Ever. I don’t even think she realizes he has anything going on that makes him different. Because he’s not. He’s unique. He’s amazing.
And the kid I’m helping raise casts no judgement. The kid I’m helping raise doesn’t give a second look. The kid I’m helping raise is befriending him.

Now, if a kid can be like this, why can’t an adult? Why are we so quick to judge and side step and turn around? How does that work? Can anyone explain it to me?

Because Selena showed me something great. Selena showed me I’m doing something right. No matter what the outward appearance is, we try to find the beauty in everyone. And while that backfires every now and then, it’s so worth it in the end.

TL;DR?

Get a blue lightbulb and light your shit up with us. Because everyone deserves to know an awesome kid like I do.

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About The Ninja

Mother, wife, pet owner, ninja.
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